Vitality and Age Go to Battle

I spend a lot of time listening to people talk about their age.   When you work in a health related field, conversing about age is as common as conversing about the weather.  

What is interesting is that age is often confused with vitality.

What is the most common phrase I hear?  I feel so old.  Second most common phrase?  I look really old.  

These statements are made regardless of actual age; the feeling of “being and looking old” is uttered by people who are 25 and who are 85.  I have heard it uttered by all demographics and backgrounds.  This is a feeling that does not discriminate.  But it is misunderstood all the same.

Feeling and looking old have nothing to do with chronological age.  I am 34 years old currently.  I feel better now than when I was 24.  I am in better physical shape, my skin, hair, and nails look better and I am not as depressed.  What has happened?

ageing and vitality

My vitality has increased.  It did not happen over night; it happened with conscious work toward that goal.  

There is a gross assumption out in the world at large: increasing in chronological age is synonymous with the deterioration of vitality.  Many people believe that the two cannot be separated.  We are sold that idea in popular culture and by our families; our own speech patterns continue to reinforce it; we witness what we believe to be examples of it.

But this does not have to be the case.  Everyday we make choices that either increase our vitality or diminish it.  It is a conscious choice if we maintain our life force or deplete it.  The responsibility is ours.  Do we want to feel and look old or do we want something different?  

Vitality, conversely, should not be confused with the idea of clinging to youth.  This is another idea we are sold in our culture.  We believe that we must be the same as a 28 year old when we are 58: the same energy level, the same body appearance, etc.  This is also not true.  

Vitality has an interesting definition:

  • power of enduring 
  • lively and animated character
  • physical or mental vigor

The physical and mental vigor of a 58 year old should not look the same as a 28 year old; there is a lot of life experience that is lived between these two ages.  I don’t want to currently live the same life that I lived when I was 24.  I am lively and animated but in a wiser, more full way than when I was younger.  I thought I knew everything then; now I see that I knew very little.

Each age has its own qualities that imbue it with vitality.  And vitality means something different to each person.  My idea of vitality may not suit you.  My idea of vitality may sound ludicrous to you.  But both your idea and mine are valid.  And vitality has nothing to do with age.  I have seen young people so soaked in apathy that there was no vitality left to be found.  And I have seen elders that danced and laughed in a way that showered vitality on all those they came in contact with.

So which do you choose: a life of feeling older day by day or a life filled to the brim with vitality?  Which will you allow to win the battle?   

 

24 HOURS

24 hours. One day.

What if you only got one? What would you do with it? Who would you see? How would you act? Where would you go?

Fortunately most of us get more than one day to live out our lives. But for too many of us there seems to be something wrong with every single day we are given. It’s too long. It’s too short. It’s cold. It’s rainy. It’s boring. It’s too busy. 

If it were your last day, do you think you would give things like the weather a second thought? If you had just one day to live, your focus would undoubtedly shift from complaining and complacency to productivity, love, and thankfulness.

Well, the truth of the matter is that every day is of equal value. Today is no less important than your last day. Each day is a brand new start and we are all given the same 24 hours to make of them what we will.

All of this may sound a little too cliché, but consider that billionaire powerhouses like Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffett are given the same 24 hours every day that you are. They are afforded no more time and no less time. The difference comes in how they choose to utilize their hours. And if you think they just somehow happened to arrive at their success by chance or privilege, read up on their life histories and you’ll find that this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

Now your goal might not be to become a billionaire, but most people are longing for something more out of life, but are either waiting around for it to come to them, or just don’t know how to go about getting it.

The good news is that it doesn’t take a genius to create an extraordinary life; just persistent focused action on a daily basis.

Maybe you would love to write a best-seller, but are intimidated by the whole process. If you got to work and wrote just one page a day, in a year’s time you will have completed a 365 page book! Even if it took you 2 days per page, you would still have a substantial 180 pages.

Advancing your life simply requires that you prioritize and change your focus. Evaluate your typical day and find those “lost moments” or “voids” in which nothing meaningful seems to take place, and then plan the night before how you are going to better utilize that time. Listen to educational programs during your commute. Instead of surfing the web, study your field of business. Turn the TV off in favor of some quality family time. 

You may not be destined to change the world, but by focusing 24 hours at a time it is easily within your power to change your life!

AW, SHE HAS HER MOTHER’S…?

AW, SHE HAS HER MOTHER’S…?

stk124464rkeIt’s almost a newborn’s rite of passage. A baby can’t escape having its looks scrutinized to determine what he/she got from whom. Grandma’s nose, Dad’s eyes, Mom’s mouth, Grandpa’s ears, and on and on.

What we never consider is that maybe the baby inherited someone’s constitutional imbalance as well. Out of sight out of mind, right?

Well, when consulting with patients, it is not uncommon to hear things like, “I get migraine headaches just like my mom used to.” Or, “I remember my dad having the same exact lower back pain I’ve been dealing with.” Or, “My kids have horrible allergy problems just like I do.”

How is it possible that conditions like this are passed on from generation to generation? After all, we’re talking about symptoms here, not looks and physical traits.

When you begin to understand where symptoms come from, one explanation becomes abundantly clear.

First of all, remember that symptoms themselves are not a problem. They are a product of the underlying cause and they also serve as your body’s warning system. So for a certain symptom pattern to be passed on from parents to their children there must be a common underlying cause that triggers the outward symptom, and most often that cause is rooted in the meridian system.

When we look at the distribution of the meridian system, it is quickly apparent that each of the meridians supply energy to a specific organ and part of the body.

By tracing the symptom back to its origin in the meridian system, examination often reveals that parent and child have the same pattern of imbalance and tend to develop a similar pattern of symptoms and signs.

So the symptoms aren’t inherited, but rather the pattern that produces those symptoms. To continually treat the symptom is useless in the long run. The most effective strategy is to correct the underlying cause (meridian imbalance) and let the symptoms take care of themselves.

A child who inherits “clumsiness” from a parent will eventually develop the bumps and bruises that come with it. The point is that he doesn’t inherit the bruises, but rather the propensity to develop them. Work on correcting the clumsiness, and the bruises go away.

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